FROM THE BLOG

The One Year, Thirty Minute Challenge :: Week 23 :: People :: Employee Development

Nobody wants to be a screw-up at their job. In fact, Dan Pink explains in his excellent 2009 book Drive, that the social sciences teach us that one of the three things people seek in their work is mastery. Pink briefly describes mastery as, “the urge to get better and better at something that matters.”

There are two things that you, as an employer, can do to tap into an employee’s intrinsic desire for mastery – provide resources, time and support for the employee’s self-initiated efforts for personal and professional growth and build an effective employee development program inside the organization.

Effective employee development programs align the interests of the employee with the interests of the company. With an effective employee development program, you are, concurrently, making a better person and a better employee.

This week’s One Year, Thirty Minute Challenge is to design a framework to start your program. The graphic above will provide direction.

The company’s interest in the employee can be view through four lenses –

  • Employees as assets to be developed. Answer these questions –
    • What resources can we provide to make this employee more valuable to the organization (formal education, additional experiences inside the organization, continuing education units (CEUs), professional certifications, webinars, industry meetings)?
    • How will this employee’s compensation reflect his/her additional value to the organization?
    • What should the accompanying gains in productivity or value creation look like?
    • How can we leverage this employee’s new skills into mentoring for other employees?
    • What soft skills does this employee need to develop in addition to technical or industry-specific skills?
  • Employees as people to be understood. Answer these questions –
    • How does this employee embody the organization’s core values?
    • How does this employee embrace the organization’s culture?
    • What motivates this employee in addition to or instead of monetary compensation? Pink’s book tells us they want autonomy (a measure of control over their work), mastery (the opportunity to improve their work skills), and purpose (a feeling that their work has meaning beyond a paycheck).
  • Employees as team members to be deployed. Answer these questions –
    • How well is this employee suited to their current position?
    • If the employee is not well suited, can they be coached or transferred?
    • If they no longer fit in the organization, should they be terminated?
    • Is the employee trusted by other team members?
    • Does the employ skillfully navigate conflict?
    • Does the employee take responsibility for mistakes without making excuses?
    • Does the employee respect and learn from the diverse viewpoints of other team members?
    • Does the employee display good absorptive capacity for new ideas, procedures, and environments?
    • Does the employee have a mentor mindset?
  • Employees as indispensable. Answer these questions –
    • Are there employees who, if they left, would put the health of the organization in jeopardy?
    • How can you most quickly mitigate this risk with additional hiring, training, or outsourcing?

 

The employee’s interest can be viewed through four lenses –

  • What does my future look like?
    • Is there a career path here for someone with my interests and skills?
    • If so, what does it look like?
    • What happens if my interests change over time (e.g. I want to move from IT to sales)?
    • Is there a path for advancement for a skilled practitioner that doesn’t include management?
    • What is the company’s policy on intellectual property?
  • Can I learn and grow in the organization (skills, aptitudes, experiences)?
    • Will you invest in my growth?
    • If so, how?
    • Will I be mentored?
    • Will you give me opportunities to try my hand at several things?
    • Will I have the opportunity to work in other parts of the country or other countries?
  • Can I keep my priorities intact if I work here?
    • Can I live the way I want to live (core values, hours, time off, great co-workers, benefits that are important to me)?
    • Will the organization morph as my life changes – realizing that my priorities might have to change over the course of my employment – children, illness, aging parents?
  • Will the organization help me navigate roadblocks as they surface?
    • Can I escape a boss that isn’t committed to my development?
    • Can I recover from involvement in a failed project?

 

Use the section above to construct two things – a questionnaire for employees and an initial outline of the growth opportunities you can include in your employee development program. Once your employee questionnaire is done, begin meeting with employees one by one and gather their responses. Take their feedback and revisit your initial employee development plan. Add items that are important to employees, fit in your budget but were absent from your original list. Remove items that, based on your interviews, are not important to employees.

Begin rolling out your plan. The conversations should be something like, “You said you were interested in Balanced Scorecards. If we had a Balance Scorecard in our organization, that would be great. If I sent you to a class for Balance Scorecards, would you come back and work with me personally to make one for the company. When we’re done, I’d like for you to present to all the department heads and explain our work. Would you be up for that?”

Have a conversation like this with everyone on your team. When you knock out one of the things important to the employee and the company, move to the next thing and keep the growth going.

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